GREAT TIT

The bird weighs 18–21 grams. It has a black neck, bluish wings and tail and greenish or bluish-grey back. The chest and belly are yellow or white; the cheeks and the spot on the back of the neck are white. The voice is a sonorous “peen-peen”. Its song sounds like loud repeated whistles. The bird is agile and mobile. When it looks for the food it hangs itself to the tips of braches with its head downwards.

The bird feeds mostly on insects. In winter it eats plant and animal food (seeds, carrion etc.). The great tit eats lots and lots of insect pests and their larvae.

It is a common bird of broad-leaved and mixed Siberian forests, forest-steppe groves, parks and lower mountain areas. The bird is widely spread in sub-boreal forests. In southern taiga the bird is common in river plains and broken woods. Sometimes it dwells in central taiga.

The great tit is partly migratory and partly resident bird. In wintertime the birds live in towns, villages and gardens. Then, in the middle of April, they migrate to their nesting places – forests and brushwood of river valleys. Starting from the end of July the bird families begin to migrate and move to gardens and villages by the end of August. The nest is usually made in a hollow at 1 meter height; sometimes the birds use splits in buildings and abandoned nests of birds of prey but the nest is always situated in a closed place. There are 9-13 white red-brown spotted eggs in a set.

LONG-TAILED TIT

This is a small downy bird with a long step-shaped tail. The weight is 8-10 grams. It resembles small feathery ball with a long tail sticking out. The back, the wings and the tail are black; the head is white and the bottom in white with dirty-pink hue. The young species have brown top of the head. The voice is a loud “chirr-chirr” or “see-see”. The birds migrate in independent flock and do not mingle with other tits.

It is a typical insect-eating bird. In autumn and in winter it feeds on frozen insects and small seeds.
The bird is sporadically met in mixed and broad-leaved forests, brushwood, parks, groves and gardens. It is common in southern Siberia including mountains, sub-boreal forests and broken woods. In autumn the tits migrate in small flocks to taiga river valleys. The bird is resident in the south and partly migratory in taiga region.

The spherical nest with a side entrance in a trunk crutch is usually situated in a forest skirt. There are 9-12 white eggs with purple-pink pattern in a set.